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of hearing about frankly. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal. and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: catherine, let me ask you, what i look what happened with the case in darden, it seems like what happened to a bunch of different companies, my take at the end of the day, for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need are jobs, jobs, jobs. there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what will happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations. we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: jamie, do you think to a c
investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> an environment where everyone is still terrified about the potential impact of the fiscal cliff, i want to give you stocks that you can fall back on in a declining market. many strong companies, high yields. let me introduce you to weingarten, a company i've liked since '85. owns shopping centers all over the u.s. 301 income-producing properties and 11 more in various stages of development. they have a yield, doesn't have a lot of leverage. company recently sold off the portfolio of industrial assets to become a pure play on retail, and 70% of the rent it collects comes from tenants that are effectively internet resistant. they say it in their own papers. meaning they're immunized against online competition. things like supermarkets, restaurants, personal care supervisors. 93.6% occupancy rate up 200 basis points year-over-year. very bullish guidance. let's check in with drew alexander, the president and ceo of weingarten reality investors. how are you? >> pleasure. great to be here. >> now, we obviously are all very focused on the
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
% interest rate environment until 2013. and after, they will still be at that point. >> the reason i ask. wednesday they've got the new announcement. operation twist which has kept rates low. >> and they'll probably extend. >> you think they'll extend that. will the market respond though? >> i think that allows the market then to price what's going to happen on the fiscal side. fiscal tightening, there's a responsibility. in europe they're trying to shrink their way into growth. i don't think that's going to work. in the united states we have to have short-term balance stimulus and longer term very controlled ratcheted down austerity. if that does happen, you could set the backdrop for a solid economy. >> what would you buy here right now? >> the discussions we're having with our clients is that they shouldn't be taking any more credit risks than they're comfortable with. everything can change very quickly if the politicians fail to come up with a responsible solution to this. foremost, you shouldn't be taking excess credit risk right now. if we slip into a recession, there's a lot of mo
started disappearing and dying off because they were not changing with the environment, but other animals came in in its place and started taking over. that's why we have these fossils. >> so, these fossils were stuck in all of these layers-- >> yes. >> --that we're seein' today when we hiked around red rock canyon. >> exactly. exactly. >> wow. it's an amazing story that is told right here. you're summing up something that happened-- how many years ago these animals were here? >> we are looking at these animals found here were from about 10,000 years but we can go almost back to the periods where the pleistocene almost about a millions years ago. >> really? >> yes. >> so the fossil history, the animal history of this part of california goes way back. >> way back. >> and thank goodness, it's been preserved. >> yes, definitely. >> and thank goodness, caltrans is still finding this stuff when it's widening highways. >> exactly. that's where most of the finds come from, accidentally. >> okay. we have left the visitor's center. and what makes this whole adventure so interesting is that everyw
there is the over hang in the environment. sandy was a punch to the stomach. people weren't shopping online because there was no electricity. at the time of the conference call we saw an uptick in the business. we said that the impact of the storm was going to take us to a performance. and i feel optimistic for the length term for our consumers. why is classicclothing not selling well but contemporary. is there any accounting for taste? >> well, look. people love what they love. accessories have been performing very well. people love something that is new. something that is the same that they have in their closet. it is not just about accessories. fashion forward is setting very well. it has to be something that they are perceiving as being new and different. when i look through, i felt that we had the real turn in this quarter. i feel that you talked about the omni channel and the internet. these are real growth vehicles. omni channel is the buzz word but it is different. you have to have the system and you have to have the capabilities to service the customer. we are investing over $100 million.
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
in such a highly charged political environment, that we should change the senate rules to make it more efficient, more responsive to the public mood, more like the house of representatives. i appreciate the frustration many have with the slow pace of the legislative process, thus i can understand the temptation to change the rules that make the senate so unique and simultaneously so frustrating." but senator dodd continued, "whether such a temptation is motivated by a noble desire to speed up the process, or by pure political expedience, i believe such changes would be unwise." in conclusion senator dodd said -- quote -- "we 100 senators are but temporary stewards of a unique american institution founded upon universal principles. the senate was designed to be different, not simply for the sake of variety but because the framers believed that the senate could and should be the venue in which statesmen would lift america up to meet its unique challenges." those who know both senator dodd and me know that we didn't agree on much during our years together in the senate. however, on this point i hav
're in a situation where the economy is not growing there are no jobs. we're facing an inflationary environment too. it is troubling, and it is just about politics, and ideology and pushing that forward no matter what without thinking -- >> what they are saying is that obama will have to give more, than entitlement cuts and spending cuts and republicans might have to acquiesce to tax hikes. lou: what is the republican party coming, monica used expression political party suicide, i don't know if that drastic but there is a defeatism i find astonishing. >> they hope to stan strong together in one message, we need a warrior that is why i'm delighted that jim demint is leaving and going to the heritage foundation, we don't have a clear champion on our issue, senator rubio does a great job but we need more out there jan the kuh cuban guy from florida. lou: i tell you, right now, i may be insulting a lot of people, but he is the most ex fisk communicate or -- effective communicate or the republican party has but he is not talking about the fiscal cliff. >> he said we have to did is not create new taxes b
as their environment, or industrial transportation, heating ventilation. so you've got a security company and what we consider to be the core of this, in many ways. significant buyback of shares, and pay dividends. but they're not moving it up, they're paying it in march. >> a new ceo comes in, listed the pelts. why should you buy anything with the pelts involved. this is work for "mad money," after pelts provided it. after. you're up 11%. in other words, you don't know before it. versus the s&p being up 4%. this goes back to 2005. he's been just a terrific guy to invest with, as, by the way, everybody tells me he's a terrific guy. >> he is a nice guy. his activism, he sort of moved it to the performance side of things, and the operational side. it was started many ways by hines, which was a nasty fight, now he's on the board. he and johnson are buddy buddy. >> johnson told me he felt pelts' idea after initial resistance, that pelts said his ideas were great. >> best buy, one of the big losers this morning. you point out merrill has a note telling a lot of people what they probably already know, fina
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
for the environment. we have to be able to spend the money, 7%. 2.5 years after stimulus we only had $67 billion. 35% was still sitting in washington. we have to change the law. there's some things express and the government accountability report on the selection of some of these projects. their release this march of 2011. specifically at -- bay released this march of 2011. specifically they said there were concerns about transparency and other issues with it. they cannot verify some of the criteria by which some of these projects were selected. can you cite any improvement in that process? you were citing a number of projects but also criticized by gao for the process. >> we tried to improve our decision making process. we have tried to use the governors as our partners on these projects. receiving proposals from them and from the state's and working with them -- states and working with them. try to improve our process for selecting projects. >> the other most recent report by the inspector general, released just weeks ago, saidmber 11, 2000112, it they raised concerns about the management framewor
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
the kinds of investment that we need to make to train our future work force and to create an environment which we can -- >> but do you think americans will remain optimistic about the state of the economy, let's say, six months or nine months from now if we have not tackle these things that we just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market, because we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxes and spending? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly, slowly to land steadily in the absence of any movement which we have seen of the course of the last year. .. it was helpful and market confidence in the stock market plunge and i think we have concerned that there will be points at which we can see that happen again if we fail to -- if we look like we're not -- [inaudible] key challenges. i think, you know, what happens on january 1st everyone is saying it's the cliff and somebody said to me it's not like the zombie apocalypse happen. i think that's right in a sense. if the market confidence goes out the window and -- [inaudible] that can be damaging to our
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
for a very good purpose to protect workers in an environment where they really had no means to protect themselves. that dynamic man many would say has changed dramatically over the years and the unions are struggling to hang onto their existence in many ways. >> the unions give them very fragmentary information on how they spend their dues money. about 7 5:00, 80% of it goes to politics electing people who will then turn around and give them pay raises if they work, for example in the public sector. bottom line, unions, i think should represent workers for collective bargaining, grievances, all kinds of issues, but if you are paying politics the worker should have a right, when 40% of workers generally vote republican if they are a union, they should have a right to say my dues go to what i want not the politicians you want as union bosses. martha: how do you think this stakes out in michigan. >> in wisconsin there was a lot of protesting, it went on for a longtime, there were recall attempts, ultimately the public backed the governor and the governor is pretty popular in michigan beca
than we've seen. i think the key question is going to be is that sustainable in an environment that's very promotional and with a competitor, sam's, that is starting to pivot toward more price reinvestment. >> your skepticism echos what the journal had this morning. great business, smart model, great balance sheet management, but at $98 here, it's hard to move the stock s that your thesis? >> it is. the stock is certainly richly valued. we also think that costco is largely a membership fee model. the company increased the membership fee about a year ago. you're now seeing decelerated growth for membership fees. it was a nice part of the thesis. that's kind of in the rear view mirror. the stock looks expensive. not a lot of margin opportunity in the model. it's a good growth opportunity. a phenomenal business. really fully valued here. >> finally, colin, the special dividend took a lot of people by surprise. do you think that marks a shift in the behavior of balance sheet management at the company? >> the company is extremely underleveraged, i.e. overcapitalized. they have excess cas
. they encouraged more science and engineers, which is fifpblete but they weren't in a creative environment where they could do good work. democracy, as again the founders would have known this, you can't just be a science and engineer in a democracy to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. so i'm very disturbed now to say that one great state university is talking about creating incentives for people to do science and engineering as undergraduates as against in effect creating disincentives for people to do humanities. you have to have people who can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like to see more of an emphasis on the science and math. i guess -- we are going to in terms of particularly in the k through eighth grade so these younger kids can look up to those role models and say is this something i want to not run from? >> one of the great stories, physics in the 1960's, young physicistsous learning how to do problem sets as graduate students, they started going back to answer the quest
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
them downward. he raise the taxed and cut -- in that environment, what starbucks has basically done, voluntarily is say we'll pay our share. or at least part of it. >> appreciate it. this guy works as a consee arj in a powerful washington d.c. building. his passion to give back to his hometown in africa has now inspired a whole community. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. now is a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-
in that environment and take whatever marginal advantage they can, not only with alawite and kurds, but everybody who remembers the experience in iraq with al qaeda. sunni jihad is as well, particularly vis-À-vis the united states or the surrogate the israelis. that is a real concern. it's one of the real tragedies of this entire affair sobol i think ambassador ford is absolutely correct by working very hard and diligently to bolster moderates, to help them both politically and materially to succeed and to win the day in syria and defeat the assad regime is absolutely the way to go and to have done that as quickly as possible. unfortunately despite ambassador ford's best efforts, my sense is that it's not really been the administration's policy, at least in practice over the last 20 months. therefore, we are perilously close. i must say i'm quite despairing that the window has almost closed in terms of an effect of u.s. ability to intervene in a meaningful way and have our interest in voice represented in a post to sawed syria and achieve anything that looks like the kind of stable political transit
members who are coming in are -- were elected in a different environment with a different mandate, if you can call it a mandate. they were elected to get something done. >> stephanie: yep. >> the 84 or 85 or 86 who are leaving, good riddance! >> stephanie: nicely said, sir. all right, representative john yarmuth, thank you sir. >> i love him. [ applause ] >> stephanie: looky here, an unsolicited testimonial. dave in new hampshire is on to my scam. dear ms. miller, i stumbled on to your program six or seven years ago. it is crystal clear that something afoot. i don't mean your hammertoe. we record your tv show on current to watch after work. oh, thank you. you can watch it because it repeats right after so it is on -- what is it, 9:00 to noon eastern and noon to 3:00 again. >> six hours. >> holy crap. >> stephanie: we purchased a soda stream. er with adding a second rescue drug. met you, john and aisha in boston. appeared at your test mony. my wife and i are from chick wag ga. coincidence? i think no
. >> what happens to the money? >> what always happens to money. we have an environment where the interest rates are low, so if you reinvest it in a fixed income product, you won't make much return. you'll have capital losses on bonds. i'm very concerned about the low interest rate in the bond market and the long period of time we've had bond yield this is low. and in the stock market, you have to be careful because there could be a sorting out among stocks between high and low dividend stocks and how they perform when these guys go x dividend. >> why couldn't you invest in g chlt and g e or comcast and get a 3% yield there. either one would be a good place.or comcast and get a 3% y there. either one would be a good place. >> wasn't i invested in company x before, didn't i have that money in there and now they're giving it back? >> now you own a larger part of the company. >> no, because -- >> if you reinvest it and they buy more share, you own a larger piece of it. >> it should be equal. they've taken that cash out of the company. the stock price should adjust lower. >> but cash is not th
pricing environment, and low interest rates. so collectively, we think these three factors would definitely drive demand verystantially next year. it's been a terrific year for the home builders. we think we're still in the third inning, not the seventh inning. both for fundamentals and the stocks. >> is there a part of the market we'll see the most building? is it the lower end or higher end? take a look at the demographic patterns, household formations depressed since 2007. there's a notion there has to be a catch-up and new households now being formed. if you're to take that piece as going forward, you would think it would be the younger end of the spectrum out there going out there -- >> absolutely. we're comfortable with the thesis that first time home buyers are going back to the market in a very strong way. we see a number of stocks doing really well who cater to that market next year, like lennar, hulte, tull will do well and our big cause of the sandskaps will show strength. arizona, california, nevada and florida. it's going to take us out. >> the concern investors migh
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)